University of Tasmania
Browse
140130 - A-meta-analysis-on-the-effect-of-.pdf (416.51 kB)

A Meta-Analysis on the Effect of Complex Training on Vertical Jump Performance

Download (416.51 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 2023-05-20, 16:32 authored by Pagaduan, J, Pojskic, H
Complex training (CT) is a strength training intervention performed by completing all the sets of a resistance exercise followed by a series of high-velocity/plyometric exercise/s. The purpose of this novel study was to conduct a meta-analysis on the effect of CT on vertical jump (VJ) performance. Five electronic databases were searched using terms related to CT and the VJ. Studies needed to include randomized trials comparing CT with traditional resistance training (RT)/plyometric training (PLYO)/control (CON) lasting ≥ 4 weeks and the VJ as a dependent variable. Seven studies qualified for the meta-analysis with two studies differentiating VJ performance from CT and RT, two studies comparing VJ performance of CT and PLYO, and two studies establishing the difference in VJ performance between CT and CON. Results indicated similar improvement in VJ performance from CT and RT (p = 0.88). On the other hand, greater VJ performance in CT than PLYO was identified (ES = 0.86; 95% CI 0.24, 1.47; p = 0.01). CT also showed significantly greater enhancement in VJ compared to CON (ES = 1.14; 95% CI 0.60, 1.68; p < 0.01). In conclusion, CT can serve as alternative training from RT in improving VJ performance. On the other hand, CT is a better option in VJ enhancement than PLYO and CON.

History

Publication title

Journal of Human Kinetics

Volume

71

Pagination

255-265

ISSN

1640-5544

Department/School

School of Health Sciences

Publisher

Akademia Wychowania Fizycznego w Katowicach * Katedra Nauk Biologicznych

Place of publication

Poland

Rights statement

Copyright 2020 Jeffrey Pagaduan, Haris Pojskic. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

Repository Status

  • Open

Socio-economic Objectives

Expanding knowledge in the health sciences

Usage metrics

    University Of Tasmania

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC