University of Tasmania
Browse
Aquatic_Insects_Wade.pdf (135.81 kB)

Aquatic insects

Download (135.81 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 2023-11-02, 06:11 authored by GC Wade
Insects include the greatest number of species of any class of animals. They have been divided into thirty Orders.
However only four Orders of insects consist of species whose larval forms are always aquatic, while another nine Orders contain some species with either aquatic larvae or which are aquatic throughout larval and adult stages.
Insects are characteried by a hard, segmented, exoskeleton and by a three segmented thorax, each bearing a pair of legs and usually with two pairs of wings attached to the second and third thoracic segments. In the Diptera and some mayflies (Ephemeroptera) the wings are reduced to a single pair, while in primitive insects such as springtails and silver fish, wings are absent. They have also been lost from some species of more advanced orders of insects.

History

Publication title

Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania

Volume

The La

Pagination

87-93

ISSN

0080-4703

Rights statement

Edited by M.R. Banks. - Copyright Royal Society of Tasmania.

Usage metrics

    Royal Society of Tasmania

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC