University of Tasmania
Browse

File(s) stored somewhere else

Please note: Linked content is NOT stored on University of Tasmania and we can't guarantee its availability, quality, security or accept any liability.

Are Australia’s universities in deficit? A tale of generic managers, audit culture and casualisation

journal contribution
posted on 2023-08-25, 04:21 authored by Megan Kimber, Lisa C Ehrich
Managerial changes to Australian universities have had considerable impact on employees. In this article, we consider some of these changes and apply a theory known as the democratic deficit to them. This theory was developed from the democratic critique of managerialism, as it has been applied in the public sector in countries with Westminster-type political systems. This deficit covers the: weakening of accountability through responsibility being replaced with responsiveness, denial of public values through the use of private-sector performance practices and hollowing out of the state through the contracting out and privatisation of public goods and services and the redefinition of citizens as customers and clients. We suggest that the increased power of managers, expansion of the audit culture and the extensive use of contract employment seem to be weakening the democratic culture and role of universities in part by replacing accountability as responsibility with accountability as responsiveness.

History

Sub-type

  • Article

Publication title

Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management

Volume

37

Issue

1

Pagination

83-97

eISSN

1469-9508

ISSN

1360-080X

Department/School

Education

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Publication status

  • Published

Rights statement

Copyright 2015 Taylor & Francis

Usage metrics

    Faculty of Education

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC