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Behavioral, metabolic, and lipidomic characterization of the 5xFADxTg30 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

journal contribution
posted on 2024-02-02, 03:54 authored by JPS Marshall, K Huynh, GI Lancaster, J Ng, JM Collins, G Pernes, A Liang, T Featherby, NA Mellet, BG Drew, AC Calkin, Anna KingAnna King, PJ Meikle, MA Febbraio, PA Adlard, Darren HenstridgeDarren Henstridge
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with both extracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and intracellular tau-containing neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). We characterized the behavioral, metabolic and lipidomic phenotype of the 5xFADxTg30 mouse model which contains overexpression of both Aβ and tau. Our results independently reproduce several phenotypic traits described previously for this model, while providing additional characterization. This model develops many aspects associated with AD including frailty, decreased survival, initiation of aspects of cognitive decline and alterations to specific lipid classes and molecular lipid species in the plasma and brain. Notably, some sex-specific differences exist in this model and motor impairment with aging in this model does compromise the utility of the model for some movement-based behavioral assessments of cognitive function. These findings provide a reference for individuals interested in using this model to understand the pathology associated with elevated Aβ and tau or for testing potential therapeutics for the treatment of AD.

History

Sub-type

  • Article

Publication title

iScience

Volume

27

Issue

2

eISSN

2589-0042

ISSN

2589-0042

Department/School

Health Sciences, Wicking Dementia Research Education Centre

Publisher

Elsevier

Publication status

  • Published online

Place of publication

United States

Rights statement

© 2024 The Author(s). Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/