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Characteristics and use of Australian high country

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posted on 2023-11-02, 06:10 authored by AB Costin
In Tasmania, with its high proportion of rugged terrain, it is easy to forget that high mountain environments are poorly represented in Australia. If we define such environments generally as the sub-alpine and alpine areas (i.e. areas above climatic treeline and extending for 1000 to 1500 ft below it) we account for some 2500 sq m. (6480 sq km) of Tasmania and about 2000 sq m. (5180 sq km) of mainland Australia (Fig. 1). The Central Plateau, and the Snowy Mountains in N.S.W., are the two most extensive areas.
The Tasmanian high country represents about 10% of the State but the mainland areas in New South Wales (including the A.C.T.) and Victoria comprise only about 0.07% of the mainland. The Tasmanian and mainland areas together comprise approximately 0.15% of Australia. Clearly, Tasmania has a custodian responsibility for Australia as a whole, as well as a large personal stake in its high country.

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Publication title

Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania

Volume

The La

Pagination

1-23

ISSN

0080-4703

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Edited by M.R. Banks.- Copyright Royal Society of Tasmania.

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