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153605- Combination of gait speed and grip strength to predict cognitive decline.pdf (776.15 kB)

Combination of gait speed and grip strength to predict cognitive decline and dementia

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posted on 2023-05-21, 13:55 authored by Orchard, SG, Polekhina, G, Ryan, R, Raj, RC, Chong, TT-J, Lockery, JE, Ward, SA, Wolfe, R, Mark NelsonMark Nelson, Reid, CM, Murray, AM, Espinoza, SE, Newman, AB, McNeil, JJ, Collyer, TA, Callisaya, ML, Woods, RL

Introduction:To determine whether slowed gait and weakened grip strength independently, or together, better identify risk of cognitive decline or dementia.

Methods:Time to walk 3 meters and grip strength were measured in a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial involving community-dwelling, initially cognitively healthy older adults (N = 19,114).

Results:Over a median 4.7 years follow-up, slow gait and weak grip strength at baseline were independently associated with risk of incident dementia (hazard ratio[HR] = 1.44, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19–1.73; and 1.24, 95% CI: 1.04–1.50, respectively) and cognitive decline (HR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.26–1.51; and 1.04, 95% CI: 0.95–1.14, respectively) and when combined, were associated with 79% and 43% increase in risk of dementia and cognitive decline, respectively. Annual declines in gait and in grip over time showed similar results.

Discussion:Gait speed and grip strength are low-cost markers that may be useful in the clinical setting to help identify and manage individuals at greater risk, or with early signs, of dementia, particularly when measured together.

History

Publication title

Alzheimer’s & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring

Volume

14

Article number

e12356

Number

e12356

Pagination

1-11

ISSN

2352-8729

Department/School

Menzies Institute for Medical Research

Publisher

John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Place of publication

United States

Rights statement

©2022 The Authors. Alzheimer’s & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring published by Wiley Periodicals, LLC on behalf of Alzheimer’s Association. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License, (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

Repository Status

  • Open

Socio-economic Objectives

Health related to ageing

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