University of Tasmania
Browse

File(s) under permanent embargo

Defining the importance of stress reduction in managing cardiovascular disease - the role of exercise

journal contribution
posted on 2023-05-21, 05:39 authored by Popovic, D, Bjelobrk, M, Tesic, M, Seman, S, Sisitha JayasingheSisitha Jayasinghe, Andrew HillsAndrew Hills, Babu, AS, Jacovljevic, DG, Stoner, G, Ozemek, C, Bond, S, Faghy, MA, Pronk, NP, Lavie, CJ, Arena, R
Traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) have long been the focus of preventive strategies. The impact of family stress, depression, anxiety, hostility, pessimism, job strain, social isolation, lack of purpose in life and social support, are well recognized risks for CVD development, however they are under-appreciated in clinical practice guidelines. The purpose of this article is to review the impact of acute and chronic stress on CVD risk, elaborate repositioning in guidelines, with emphasis to approaches for stress reduction. Regular exercise, both aerobic and resistance, leads to better adaptiveness to other types of stress, however, it remains unknown whether the total amount of stress one can receive before negative health effects is unlimited. Evidently, marked reductions in stress related disorders are shown following formal cardiac rehabilitation programs. Attendance of cardiac rehabilitation is highly recommended for the stress-related mortality risk reduction. Innovative approaches to offset the broad challenges that CVD pose, augmented by sustained exposure to stress, are desperately needed, but hindered by a lack of successful population-level interventions that promote lasting change.

History

Publication title

Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases

Volume

70

Pagination

84-93

ISSN

0033-0620

Department/School

School of Health Sciences

Publisher

W B Saunders Co

Place of publication

Independence Square West Curtis Center, Ste 300, Philadelphia, USA, Pa, 19106-3399

Rights statement

Copyright 2022 Elsevier Inc.

Repository Status

  • Restricted

Socio-economic Objectives

Other health not elsewhere classified

Usage metrics

    University Of Tasmania

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC