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Enhanced organic species identification via laser structuring of carbon monolithic surfaces

journal contribution
posted on 2023-05-21, 12:01 authored by He, XY, Chikarakara, E, Nesterenko, EP, Nesterenko, PN, Mousavian, RT, Brett PaullBrett Paull, Brabazon, D
It is important to be able to control the physical and chemical integrity of carbon-based porous monolith structures while being tailored for targeted analytical, energy and catalytic based applications. A set up using a CO2 laser in continuous mode (CW CO2 laser) was implemented to cut fragile and porous carbon monolithic (CM) and nanotemplated carbon monolithic (NTCM) rods into discs with a prescribed thickness and dimensional integrity (denoted as LCM and LNTCM, or LCMs). Changes in structure, porosity and composition of LCMs were induced by the efficient thermal energy afforded by the CW CO2 laser irradiation under tightly controlled process conditions. The main effects observed before and after laser cutting were studied in comparison with traditional scalpel blade cutting of carbon monolithic (SCM). FE-SEM images confirmed that the resulting LCMs exhibited a more open, interconnected macroporous structure and smoothed mesopores to a depth of approximately 5 um, while the structure of the bulk section remained intact. Minimal changes in chemical compositions were confirmed by XPS. Raman spectroscopy revealed a modest increase in the graphitic content on the cross sections of LCM discs. Phenol and Bisphenol A (BPA) was used as a model analyte for demonstration of resulting discs adsorption performance.

History

Publication title

Applied Surface Science

Volume

493

Pagination

829-837

ISSN

0169-4332

Department/School

School of Natural Sciences

Publisher

Elsevier Science Bv

Place of publication

Po Box 211, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 1000 Ae

Rights statement

© 2019 Published by Elsevier B.V.

Repository Status

  • Restricted

Socio-economic Objectives

Industrial chemicals and related products not elsewhere classified

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