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Movement Disord Clin Pract - 2022 - Newby - Geste Antagoniste Effects on Motor Performance in Dystonia A Kinematic Study.pdf (365.63 kB)

Geste antagoniste effects on motor performance in dystonia—a kinematic study

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posted on 2023-05-21, 08:28 authored by Newby, R, Muhamed, S, Jane AltyJane Alty, Cosgrove, J, Jamieson, S, Smith, S, Kempster, P

Background

The kinematic effects of gestes have not previously been studied. The mechanism(s) by which these sensory tricks modify dystonic movement is not well understood.

Objectives

A kinematic investigation of the geste phenomenon in patients with dystonia.

Methods

Twenty-three patients with dystonia associated with a geste were studied. Twenty-nine healthy controls also participated. Fifteen seconds of finger tapping was recorded by electromagnetic sensors, and the task was repeated with geste. Separable motor components were extracted using a custom-written MATLAB script. Performance with and without geste was compared using Wilcoxon signed ranks testing.

Results

Speed and fluency of finger tapping is impaired in dystonia. When patients executed their geste, speed of movement (amplitude x frequency) increased (p<0.0001), and halts decreased (p = 0.007).

Conclusions

That gestes improve not only dystonic muscle contraction but also the efficiency of voluntary movement suggests a broad influence at the premotor control stage.

History

Publication title

Movement Disorders Clinical Practice

Volume

9

Issue

6

Pagination

759-764

ISSN

0885-3185

Department/School

Wicking Dementia Research Education Centre

Publisher

John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Place of publication

Div John Wiley & Sons Inc, 605 Third Ave, New York, USA, Ny, 10158-0012

Rights statement

© 2022 The Authors. Movement Disorders Clinical Practice published by Wiley Periodicals LLC. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) License, (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Repository Status

  • Open

Socio-economic Objectives

Diagnosis of human diseases and conditions

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