University Of Tasmania
Browse
136058 - Highly variable iron content modulates iceberg-ocean fertilisation.pdf (1.67 MB)
Download file

Highly variable iron content modulates iceberg-ocean fertilisation and potential carbon export

Download (1.67 MB)
journal contribution
posted on 2023-05-20, 08:37 authored by Hopwood, MJ, Carroll, D, Hofer, J, Achterberg, EP, Meire, L, Le Moigne, FAC, Lennart BachLennart Bach, Eich, C, Sutherland, DA, Gonzalez, HE
Marine phytoplankton growth at high latitudes is extensively limited by iron availability. Icebergs are a vector transporting the bioessential micronutrient iron into polar oceans. Therefore, increasing iceberg fluxes due to global warming have the potential to increase marine productivity and carbon export, creating a negative climate feedback. However, the magnitude of the iceberg iron flux, the subsequent fertilization effect and the resultant carbon export have not been quantified. Using a global analysis of iceberg samples, we reveal that iceberg iron concentrations vary over 6 orders of magnitude. Our results demonstrate that, whilst icebergs are the largest source of iron to the polar oceans, the heterogeneous iron distribution within ice moderates iron delivery to offshore waters and likely also affects the subsequent ocean iron enrichment. Future marine productivity may therefore be not only sensitive to increasing total iceberg fluxes, but also to changing iceberg properties, internal sediment distribution and melt dynamics.

History

Publication title

Nature Communications

Volume

10

Article number

5261

Number

5261

Pagination

1-10

ISSN

2041-1723

Department/School

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies

Publisher

Nature Publishing Group

Place of publication

United Kingdom

Rights statement

Copyright 2019 The Authors. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Repository Status

  • Open

Socio-economic Objectives

Assessment and management of coastal and estuarine ecosystems

Usage metrics

    University Of Tasmania

    Exports