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How Tasmanian Emergency Departments 'Choose Wisely' When Investigating Suspected Pulmonary Embolism

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posted on 2023-07-28, 05:10 authored by Lauren ThurlowLauren Thurlow, Pieter Van DamPieter Van Dam, Sarah PriorSarah Prior, Viet TranViet Tran
Overuse of computed tomography pulmonary angiograms (CTPAs) for diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) has been recognised as an issue for over ten years, with Choosing Wisely Australia recommending that CTPAs only be ordered if indicated by a clinical practice guideline (CPG). This study aimed to explore the use of evidence-based practice within regional Tasmanian emergency departments in relation to CTPA orders by determining whether CTPAs were ordered in accordance with validated CPGs. We conducted a retrospective medical record review of all patients who underwent CTPA across all public emergency departments in Tasmania between 1 August 2018 and 31 December 2019 inclusive. Data from 2758 CTPAs across four emergency departments were included. PE was reported in 343 (12.4%) of CTPAs conducted, with yield ranging from 8.2% to 16.1% between the four sites. Overall, 52.1% of participants had neither a CPG documented, nor a D-dimer conducted before their scan. A CPG was documented before 11.8% of scans, while D-dimer was conducted before 43% of CTPAs. The findings presented in this study indicate that Tasmanian emergency departments are not consistently 'Choosing Wisely' when investigating PE. Further research is required to identify explanations for these findings.

History

Publication title

Healthcare

Volume

11

Issue

11

Pagination

10

eISSN

2227-9032

Department/School

Medicine, Nursing, Research Integrity & Ethics

Publisher

MDPI

Publication status

  • Published

Rights statement

Copyright 2023 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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