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Molecular changes in the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway are common in gastric cancer

journal contribution
posted on 2023-05-18, 04:25 authored by Tran, TN, Kate Brettingham-MooreKate Brettingham-Moore, Duong, CP, Mitchell, C, Clemons, NJ, Phillips, WA

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is an important signalling pathway that is frequently activated in cancer cells. This has led to the emergence of PI3K inhibitors as potential new treatment modalities for many cancers. We have investigated the frequency of molecular changes in the PI3K pathway in gastric cancer.

METHODS: A series of sixty one human gastric cancer specimens and nine human gastric cancer cell lines were screened for PIK3CA mutations and copy number gain by direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), respectively. PTEN protein levels were assessed by immunohistochemistry.

RESULTS: Alterations in the PI3K pathway were found in 33 of 61 (54%) gastric tumours. PIK3CA mutation and copy number gain were detected in 3 (4.9%) and 8 (13.1%), respectively, of 61 gastric cancer samples while PTEN loss was detected in 24 (39%) of the tumours. Two tumours had both PTEN loss and PIK3CA copy number gain. There were no significant associations between these PI3K pathway changes and the clinical features of the tumours.

CONCLUSIONS: Alterations in the PI3K pathway are frequent in gastric tumours implicating this pathway as a legitimate therapeutic target in gastric cancer.

History

Publication title

Journal of Surgical Oncology

Volume

108

Pagination

113-120

ISSN

0022-4790

Department/School

Menzies Institute for Medical Research

Publisher

Wiley-Liss

Place of publication

Div John Wiley & Sons Inc, 605 Third Ave, New York, USA, Ny, 10158-0012

Rights statement

Copyright 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Repository Status

  • Restricted

Socio-economic Objectives

Expanding knowledge in the health sciences

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