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Outcomes following the percutaneous coronary intervention in contemporary Vietnamese practice: Insight from a single centre prospective cohort

journal contribution
posted on 2023-05-21, 02:49 authored by Vu, HTT, Norman, R, Ngoc Minh Pham, Nguyen, HTT, Pham, HM, Nguyen, QN, Do, LD, Tran, HB, Huxley, RR, Lee, CMY, Hoang, TM, Reid, CM

Background: Evidence regarding the outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in low-and-middle incomes countries remains limited.

Objectives: To report the outcomes post PCI at discharge, 30 days and 12 months in Vietnam and identify the key factors associated with adverse outcomes at 12 months.

Methods: We used data from a single centre prospective cohort in Vietnam. Data regarding demographics, clinical presentation, procedural information, and outcomes of patients were collected and analysed. Primary outcomes were mortality and major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events.

Results: In total, 926 patients were included. Poor outcomes were relatively low in those undergoing PCI. Predictors of mortality and major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events at 12 months post-PCI included being older than 75, being male, having acute myocardial infarction, left ventricular ejection fraction ≤ 40%, prior cerebral vascular disease and having an unsuccessful PCI.

Conclusions: Adverse outcomes of patients undergoing PCI in Vietnam are relatively low in comparison with those reported in other countries across the Asia Pacific region. Identification of factors associated with poor outcomes is beneficial for improving the quality of cardiac care and developing the prediction model of outcomes post-PCI in Vietnam.

History

Publication title

Heart and Lung

Volume

50

Issue

5

Pagination

634-639

ISSN

0147-9563

Department/School

Menzies Institute for Medical Research

Publisher

Mosby

Place of publication

United States

Rights statement

© 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Repository Status

  • Restricted

Socio-economic Objectives

Prevention of human diseases and conditions

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