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Paternal source of germ plasm determinants in the viviparous teleost, Gambusia holbrooki; dads do matter

journal contribution
posted on 2024-02-14, 01:06 authored by Komeil Razmi, Seyed Ehsan MousaviSeyed Ehsan Mousavi, Jawahar PATIL
The identity of germ cells, the progenitors of life, is thought to be acquired by two modes; either by maternal signals (preformed) or induced de novo from pluripotent cells (epigenesis) in the developing embryos. However, paternal roles seem enshrouded or completely overlooked in this fundamental biological process. Hence, we investigated the presence of germplasm transcripts in the sperm of Gambusia holbrooki, a live-bearing fish, demonstrating their presence and suggesting paternal contributions. Interestingly, not all germplasm markers were present (nanos1 and tdrd6) in the sperm, but some were conspicuous (dazl, dnd-α, piwi II, and vasa), indicating that the latter is required for establishing germ cell identity in the progeny, with a possible parent-specific role. Furthermore, there were also spatial differences in the distribution of these determinants, suggesting additional roles in sperm physiology and/or fertility. Our results support the hypothesis that dads also play a vital role in establishing the germ cell identity, especially in G. holbrooki, which shares elements of both preformation and induction modes of germline determination. This, coupled with its life history traits, makes G. holbrooki an excellent system for dissecting evolutionary relationships between the two germline determination modes, their underpinning mechanisms and ultimately the perpetuity of life.

History

Sub-type

  • Article

Publication title

DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY

Medium

Print-Electronic

Volume

502

Pagination

14-19:6

eISSN

1095-564X

ISSN

0012-1606

Department/School

Ecology and Biodiversity, Sustainable Marine Research Collaboration

Publisher

ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE

Publication status

  • Published

Place of publication

United States

Event Venue

Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Taroona, TAS, 7053, Australia.

Rights statement

Copyright 2023 Elsevier