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Social disinhibition in acquired brain injury and neurological disease: a concept analysis

Background: Social disinhibition is becoming increasingly recognised in the neuropsychological literature as a complex and debilitating sequalae associated with acquired frontal lobe damage. Despite this, the term has been inconsistently defined and described in both clinical and research contexts. The purpose of this paper was to explore and examine the concept of social disinhibition in the context of brain injury and other organic neurological conditions.

Methods: A literature search for articles published in the English language from journal inception to June 2021 was conducted using MEDLINE, PsycInfo, Embase, CINAHL and Web of Science. A 'concept analysis' was conducted on the identified literature using Walker & Avant's (2019) framework.

Results: The analysis suggested that while several terms are often used interchangeably with social disinhibition, including impulsivity and behavioural dysregulation, these terms may be differentiated and defined separately within the broader domain of 'behaviours of concern'. Attributes, antecedents and consequences of social disinhibition were also identified and discussed.

Conclusions: Clarifying the concept of social disinhibition has important implications in both clinical and research contexts, including increased understanding of the behaviours, more accurate estimates of incidence and prevalence, and the development and implementation of targeted rehabilitation programmes.

History

Publication title

Brain Impairment

Pagination

1-19

ISSN

1839-5252

Department/School

School of Psychological Sciences

Publisher

Cambridge University Press

Place of publication

United Kingdom

Rights statement

© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of Australasian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment.

Repository Status

  • Restricted

Socio-economic Objectives

Clinical health not elsewhere classified

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