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Tempering growth: planning for the challenges of climate change and growth management in SEQ

journal contribution
posted on 2023-05-19, 17:12 authored by Dedekorkut, A, Mustelin, J, Howes, M, Jason ByrneJason Byrne
South East Queensland (SEQ) has experienced voracious growth over the past five decades. Spanning some 200 km, this sprawling subtropical coastal conurbation is beginning to reach its ecological and socio-political limits. Over the last decade there have been concerted efforts to manage this growth with a new regime of plans and policies, but climate change has significantly complicated the challenge. This paper offers a preliminary analysis of the situation. The major climate adaptation challenges for the region are identified, including: rising sea levels, storm surges, higher temperatures, and increased freshwater scarcity. These will impact most on the elderly, sick and disadvantaged who have lower levels of resilience. The key plans and policies that address these issues are then reviewed, including: ClimateQ; the SEQ Regional Plan; and, the Draft SEQ Climate Change Management Plan. The overall planning regime is appraised in light of five core themes of strong ecological modernisation (technological innovation; engaging with economic imperatives; political and institutional change; transforming the role of social movements and discursive change) and the principles of environmental justice. It is argued that together these schools of thought could provide criteria for a more effective and equitable climate adaptation response for the region.

History

Publication title

Australian Planner

Volume

47

Pagination

203-215

ISSN

0729-3682

Department/School

School of Geography, Planning and Spatial Sciences

Publisher

Routledge

Place of publication

Australia

Rights statement

Copyright 2010 Planning Institute Australia

Repository Status

  • Restricted

Socio-economic Objectives

Evaluation, allocation, and impacts of land use

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