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Saner 2023 - The effect of sleep restriction, with or without high-intensity interval exercise, on behavioural alertness and mood state in young healthy males.pdf (2.08 MB)

The effect of sleep restriction, with or without high-intensity interval exercise, on behavioural alertness and mood state in young healthy males

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posted on 2023-08-22, 05:26 authored by Nicholas J Saner, Matthew J-C Lee, Nathan PitchfordNathan Pitchford, James R Broatch, Greg D Roach, David J Bishop, Jonathan D Bartlett
Mood state and alertness are negatively affected by sleep loss, and can be positively influenced by exercise. However, the potential mitigating effects of exercise on sleep-loss-induced changes in mood state and alertness have not been studied comprehensively. Twenty-four healthy young males were matched into one of three, 5-night sleep interventions: normal sleep (NS; total sleep time (TST) per night = 449 ± 22 min), sleep restriction (SR; TST = 230 ± 5 min), or sleep restriction and exercise (SR + EX; TST = 235 ± 5 min, plus three sessions of high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE)). Mood state was assessed using the profile of mood states (POMS) and a daily well-being questionnaire. Alertness was assessed using psychomotor vigilance testing (PVT). Following the intervention, POMS total mood disturbance scores significantly increased for both the SR and SR + EX groups, and were greater than the NS group (SR vs NS; 31.0 ± 10.7 A.U., [4.4-57.7 A.U.], p = 0.020; SR + EX vs NS; 38.6 ± 14.9 A.U., [11.1-66.1 A.U.], p = 0.004). The PVT reaction times increased in the SR (p = 0.049) and SR + EX groups (p = 0.033) and the daily well-being questionnaire revealed increased levels of fatigue in both groups (SR; p = 0.041, SR + EX; p = 0.026) during the intervention. Despite previously demonstrated physiological benefits of performing three sessions of HIIE during five nights of sleep restriction, the detriments to mood, wellness, and alertness were not mitigated by exercise in this study. Whether alternatively timed exercise sessions or other exercise protocols could promote more positive outcomes on these factors during sleep restriction requires further research.

History

Publication title

Journal of Sleep Research

Pagination

12

eISSN

1365-2869

ISSN

0962-1105

Department/School

Health Sciences

Publisher

WILEY

Publication status

  • Published online

Rights statement

This is an open access article under the terms of theCreative Commons AttributionLicense, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2023 The Authors.

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