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Temperate climates, warmer houses and built fabric challenges

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conference contribution
posted on 2023-05-23, 13:17 authored by Mark DewsburyMark Dewsbury, Law, T

The recent enhancements of the National Construction Code have reduced the amount of energy required to heat and cool Australian homes. To date, the result of these changes, within Australia's temperate and cool-temperate climates, is generally warmer internal temperatures. However, many of these warmer homes are presenting condensation and mould. This is demonstrating a general non-awareness of vapour pressure management within the Australian design and construction professions. This paper discusses research from the architectural and medical science disciplines. The paper identifies a significant gap in appropriate building regulation and building science knowledge within this field in Australia.

(Presented at the International High-Performance Built Environment Conference - a Sustainable Built Environment Conference 2016 Series (Sbe16)).

History

Publication title

Procedia Engineering

Volume

180

Pagination

1065-1074

ISSN

1877-7058

Department/School

School of Architecture and Design

Publisher

Elsevier Science Bv

Place of publication

Netherlands

Event title

International High-Performance Built Environment Conference - a Sustainable Built Environment Conference 2016 Series (Sbe16), Ihbe 2016

Event Venue

Sydney

Date of Event (Start Date)

2016-11-17

Date of Event (End Date)

2016-11-18

Rights statement

Copyright 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Repository Status

  • Open

Socio-economic Objectives

Residential construction processes

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